Skip to main content

About your Search

20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
announced 43 new laws they say will fix the economy, the people shrugged. no one really believes that will work, because spaniards aren't working-- that's the problem-- unemployment is rampant now over 25%. whilst the property crash that started the crisis is still festering. further austerity measures will simply suck more money out of the economy and threaten an even deeper recession. spain is trying to save a total of 40 billion from its budget which will hurt. it won't be as excruciately painful as a new round of cuts in greece. they are trying to save an extra 12 billion from a budget that has already been pared to the bone. no one is spared the pain greece not even the most vulnerable. disabled protestors took to the streets today pleading for their benefits not to be cut further. they can no longer even afford the medicine they need they say. >> sreenivasan: the greek government today came to basic agreement on $15 billion worth of cuts in spending over the next two years. the country needs to make the cuts if it wants to keep receiving bailout loans from the e.u. and inte
pressed and the full force of the law obviously needs to play on that. the bigger issue about how a democracy fashion as proper conversation in fragmented societies is something that i think is very, very profound. but if you think about it, the gridlock you complain about, we can't get agreement in our country about building a third runway in heathrow airport, much less care about the elderly swrenchts the same problem. >> there is gridlock on syria, there is grid lock on the saving of the eu, there is gridlock at the national politics, and representative politics is facing a very, very buying set of charges, people feel they are not getting a proper say. now, there are reforms in every country that are going to have to be particular to that country, but there is a more generic issue about how in a world of multiaccess to information we have a proper conversation about how to take our countries forward. >> it is good to see you. >> very nice to see you. >> david miliband, former foreign minister and now a member of parliament in great britain. thank you for joining us. see you ne
as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think that could be an argument for them in favor of delivering a clear and unified and strong message from the international community. >> rose: do you think it's a stalemate today? >> more or less it is a stalemate. with severe consequences for the people of syria. and i think the international community has a responsibility to deliver a very clear message to the assad regime that they must stop violence and initiate a process towards democracy in syria. no regime can in the long-term neglect the will of the people. >> rose: when you look at the balkans, we had an intervention without a u.n. resolution. nato acted without a u.n. resolution. can you imagine that happening in syria? >> testimony brief answer is no, but let me stress that nato acted on the basic of the principles of the u.n. charter when we took responsibility for the operation in kosovo.
the first thing you have to do is let all of the 2001-2003 tax laws sunset. go away. that's a tax increase, most of which the president wouldn't support. then you have to cut by $5 trillion. so compared to where we are now it's a much smaller reduction in tax revenue which makes it easier to fill the revenue hole and we have five studies, one from martin feldstein, one from the tax foundation, one from the american enterprise institute, we have studies that show there are plans that meet the governor's goal, cut rates 20% across the board, don't lose revenue and make sure the rich pay their fair share of taxes so it can be done. >> brown: but as to filling the hole that we're talking about" those studies -- >> they fill the hole. >> brown: but it depends on where you're at in terms of your income. >> so i think the key is there are tax plans that can fill that hole. jared can write a tax plan that fills that hole and raises taxes and those are the one it is democrats are referring to. >> brown: go ahead. >> first of all, some of what doug just said confused me even more about this because
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)